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Comprehensive List of Obamacare Tax Hikes [Jan. 15th, 2011|12:27 pm]
Minnesota Politics

vnsplshr
Comprehensive List of Obamacare Tax Hikes

http://www.atr.org/comprehensive-list-tax-hikes-obamacare-a5758

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(no subject) [Oct. 5th, 2010|05:11 pm]
Minnesota Politics

vnsplshr


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Two opportunities to urge government sanity [Apr. 10th, 2009|10:53 am]
Minnesota Politics

vnsplshr
Twin Cities Tax Day Tea Party

Date: Wednesday, April 15th, 2009
Time: 5 pm - 8 pm
Location: Minnesota State Capitol Bldg. in Saint Paul

Details: http://teapartymn.com

-------------------------------------------

2009 Tax Cut Rally

Date: Saturday, May 2nd, 2009
Time: 11am - 4pm
Location: Minnesota State Capitol Bldg. in Saint Paul

http://www.ktlkfm.com/pages/taxcut.html

-------------------------------------------

You're overtaxed. Say something about it.

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Funny Business in Minnesota [Jan. 5th, 2009|11:44 pm]
Minnesota Politics

vnsplshr
Funny Business in Minnesota

"Thanks to the machinations of Democratic Secretary of State Mark Ritchie and a meek state Canvassing Board, Mr. Franken may emerge as an illegitimate victor."

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Analyst: Senate may decide Minn. election [Nov. 29th, 2008|08:05 pm]
Minnesota Politics

bispo
[music |The Rapture - House of Jealous Lovers | Powered by Last.fm]

mp_main_wide_ColemanFranken452
ST. PAUL, Minn., Nov. 29 (UPI) -- A statement by U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., makes it more likely the Senate could intervene in a Minnesota election, an analyst says.

The Minnesota U.S. Senate contest between incumbent Republican Norm Coleman and Democratic challenger Al Franken is undergoing a recount, with the candidates separated by less than 300 votes out of 2.9 million cast. But a controversial decision by the state's Elections Canvassing Board could end up throwing the election into the lap of the Senate itself, a scholar told Minnesota Public Radio.

"Ultimately, the Senate has complete authority to determine who was elected," Washington University political scientist Steven Smith told the broadcaster, citing the canvassing board's decision this week to disallow disputed absentee ballots that Franken had urged be counted.

The board's move was "a cause for great concern," Reid said this week, and those comments may indicate his willingness to start a Senate investigation of the Minnesota recount, Smith said. And if so, it's possible that Franken's argument regarding rejected absentee ballots could be reconsidered by U.S. senators.

Under the constitution, the Senate is the final arbiter of its membership, MPR noted.
source
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(no subject) [Nov. 8th, 2008|07:36 pm]
Minnesota Politics

vikingrob
If you haven't yet looked, you may want to take a look at some of the actual ballots that were challenged in the Senate recount. They make for some interesting review.

One ballot challenged by the Coleman camp that I think is an unreasonable challenge was challenged on the basis of identifying marks. Looking at the ballot, it appears the "identifying marks" were the result of ink from a felt-tip pen bleeding through the paper. The "identifying marks" correspond to votes on the races on the other side of the ballot.
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Here’s one way to send a protest with your ballot [Nov. 24th, 2008|11:37 pm]
Minnesota Politics

bispo
This Anoka County voter was clearly ready for the end of campaign season. This ballot has an almost poetic quality.
protestballot1
second partCollapse )
You need to
make voting
easier to do
This is
ridiculous
Enough with the
political ads
This is
what happens
when you
bombard me
with them
Al Franken and
Norm Coleman
are so annoying
they’re repugnant
From now on
I’ll give up
my right
to vote
if I get
beat down with
political ads
Advertise that
Minnesota
I’d
rather
have
Nick
DiPalo
for
President
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
Ha
source: star tribune
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It's Alive! [Nov. 13th, 2008|06:24 am]
Minnesota Politics

lsanderson
NY Times
November 13, 2008
Op-Ed Columnist
The Election Lives!
By GAIL COLLINS

Americans are going through election withdrawal, trying to adjust to life without poll numbers. Really, we’ve heard quite a bit of whining on this subject lately.

But there’s still Minnesota! The U.S. Senate race there is up in the air. You may want to consider becoming totally obsessed with it, jumping out of bed every morning and racing to the computer to check for the latest vote count.

Or perhaps not. Still, it’s something to hang on to. More
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Perhaps this explains the GOP's fears [Nov. 8th, 2008|07:36 pm]
Minnesota Politics

vikingrob
Upon examination of the precinct-by-precinct election return data from the Secretary of State's website, there are a couple interesting things to note:

1. When you proportionately adjust the number of votes for each candidate in the Senate race so that all precincts have at least as many votes in the Senate race as in the presidential race, Franken wins by a little over 1,000 votes.

2. Of the 20 precincts with the largest difference between presidential votes and Senate votes with more votes for president, six are in Minneapolis and four are in St. Paul. One precinct in Winona has the largest discrepancy in the state at 120 votes, and there are several other precincts in Winona County with relatively large discrepancies. Other large discrepancies were found in certain precincts in Stearns County, and another in Otsego, located in Wright County.

3. For the second straight election, Michele Bachman polled a lesser percentage in Senate District 52, the Senate district she represented for six years before moving to Congress, than in the 6th Congressional district as a whole. She polled 45.777% in District 52 compared to 46.406% overall. El Tinklenberg polled 44.606% in District 52 compared to 43.434% overall.
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Slate: That's Not Funny [Oct. 29th, 2008|12:58 am]
Minnesota Politics

bispo
In theory, Americans love an anti-politician—an outsider who tells the voters what he actually thinks rather than suffocating his personality beneath layers of polspeak. Think of Warren Beatty in Bulworth, Michael Douglas in The American President. In reality, voters tend to ruthlessly punish any spark of genuine personality. And the worst personality trait you can have, politically speaking, is humor—not the corny, banquet-speaker humor of Ronald Reagan but humor as a cutting tool of social analysis.

Consider the case of Al Franken. The Saturday Night Live writer turned Minnesota Senate candidate spent most of the last year trailing badly as pundits clucked their tongues at his "potty mouth." Lately, he has pulled even with his opponent, Norm Coleman, but he's done so only by riding an overwhelming anti-Republican wave and running a relentlessly dull, cookie-cutter campaign. Even so, his shameful comic past has marked him indelibly. Former Bush speechwriter Michael Gerson warned that Franken's election would "push our culture toward vulgarity and viciousness." Even some Democrats apparently regard him as a bad joke. Not long ago, NBC political director Chuck Todd waxed incredulous at the prospect of Franken winning. "I have had multiple very high-level Democrats on the Hill sit there with their fingers crossed," reported Todd. "They are scared of Franken winning. More importantly, they fear that if Franken wins, then every liberal Hollywood type is going to say, 'Hey, I can run for office, too.' " Coleman recently released a campaign flier calling Franken "completely unfit for public office" because of his comedy career.

It's understandable that people might, at first blush, think of Franken as the equivalent of Sen. Carrot Top—or the next Jesse Ventura, a fellow Minnesotan to whom Franken is incessantly compared. It doesn't help that Franken is best known for playing the goofy character Stuart Smalley on Saturday Night Live. And so Franken's comedic career has been transformed in the public mind into the job-training equivalent of dressing up in tights and smashing a fake chair over somebody's head.
Continued...
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